wisdom teethTypically between the ages of 17 and 25, adults will develop a third (or more!) set of molars at the back of their gum line. These extra sets of molars are called “wisdom teeth.” For some people, there’s just not enough room in their mouth or jaw for these teeth to come in, which may cause problems with their bite or smile if they aren’t removed. Wisdom teeth that don’t have room to break through are considered “impacted,” and must be removed before damage is done to your other molars or gums.

So what’s the purpose of wisdom teeth if they’re just going to need to be pulled?

Way back in time, before the advent of modern dental hygiene, these extra molars could replace damaged (or pulled) molars, similar to the idea of how our baby teeth fall out and new ones grow back into their place. Others believe that human jaws were much bigger during that time period and were capable of accommodating these extra teeth for the purpose of noshing on lots of leafy greens.

I was told mine needed to be removed. Is this going to hurt?

The short answer is, “No.” Despite some of the dreadful wisdom teeth sagas you may have heard from friends or family, it doesn’t have to be an ugly or painful experience for you. In fact, leaving them alone could contribute to future complications, so it’s better to address them sooner than later. Our office goes the distance when it comes to making you comfortable, with board-certified sedation dentist Reem Kidess.

To learn more about what we do, or to schedule a consultation/appointment, please visit this page or call our office today at 480-991-2290!